Victims' Rights Caucus

Speeches

A progressive, secularist judge has declared that the establishing of a National Day of Prayer violates the constitutional ban on government-backed religion. Last week, U.S. District Judge Barbara B. Crabb, who was appointed by former Democratic President Jimmy Carter, issued the decision in a case challenging the law that requires the president to designate the first Thursday in May as the National Day of Prayer. Judge Crabbs decision dismisses much of Americas historical heritage, judicial precedence, and years of Congressional and Executive laws by her decision. Apparently, the judge is somewhat naive concerning the law that established The National Day of Prayer in America. It was the Continental Congress that issued a day of prayer in 1775 to designate a time for prayer in forming a new nation. During the Quasi-War with France, President John Adams declared May 9, 1798 as a day of solemn humiliation, fasting, and prayer, during which citizens of all faiths were asked to pray, that our country may be protected from all the dangers which threaten it. In 1988, President Ronald Reagan amended the law decreeing that the National Day of Prayer should be held on the first Thursday of May. It seems that Judge Crabb based her decision on the all too often-quoted claim that the separation of church and state is clearly evident in the Constitution.

The so-called separation of Church and state argument has been around for a long time. It has been a spurious claim used by atheists, progressive secularists, activists, liberal judges, and numerous anti-Christian groups who desire to eradicate any trace of Christianity from Americas historical roots. The secular, English political philosopher John Lock is credited with fathering the phrase separation of church and state. When the Supreme Court handed down their decree concerning the separation of church and state they based much of their opinion from a letter that Thomas Jefferson wrote to the Danbury Baptists in 1802. Jefferson assured the Baptists that the government was not going to prefer one denomination over another. He believed that He was correct when he felt that the First Amendment protected the Baptist from a government-established religion. In other words, he believed that all religions have the freedom of expression without governmental interference. Jefferson never imagined that the Court or Congress would later take his assuring words to the Danbury Baptists and use them as a battering ram to separate Americans from their historical Christian heritage. There are millions of Americans today who know that Natures Laws and Natures God are unalterably intertwined in Americas Constitution. Millions of Americans still believe, as our Founders did, that there are truths which are self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. That to secure these rights Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed. Unfortunately our government today is not securing these rights for its citizens, but rather taking them from them!

On Wednesday, U.S. Rep. Lynn Westmoreland, Third Congressional District, R-Grantville, joined members of the Congressional Prayer Caucus and faith leaders to respond to the judges ruling that the law designating the National Day of Prayer is unconstitutional. He also called on the Department of Justice to act immediately with an appeal to the decision, while noting that the ruling wont take effect until after the appeals process is fully exhausted. Concerned Americans should immediately appeal to the President and to the Attorney General to reinstate the law that the Judge has deemed unconstitutional. There is still time to reverse the judges ruling. In light of the judges ruling